Nutrition – Part 1: What to eat

Ahh, nutrition – probably one of the most debated areas on the Wheel of Health. There is so much that can be written about eating a “healthy diet” but given that the recommendations seem to change daily, where does one start? Eggs are bad for you. Whoops, now they’re good for you! Eat low fat foods. Nope, now you need healthy fats. No wonder so many people are confused and frustrated – and therefore, reach for the quickest, most convenient thing they can eat regardless of its nutritional value. Who has time to figure it out, right?

Let me start by stating that I do not have a degree in nutrition and I am not a registered or licensed dietician so I will not be dispensing any specific dietary advice. My goal with this post is to help weed through much of the conflicting information out there and present some basic guidelines that most of the experts do agree on when it comes to the food we put in our bodies. I am of the firm belief that everybody – and every BODY – is unique and thus, what works for one person will not work for someone else. The bottom line is choosing foods that nourish and strengthen your body and mind.

What the experts say

It’s probably no surprise that even the experts can’t agree on what specific diet is best for us. However, in a review of the health benefits of many popular diets (think low fat, low carb, vegan, Mediterranean, paleo and so on), there were a few general patterns that rose to the top. In a nutshell, they include:

  • Eat minimally processed foods direct from nature
  • Eat mostly plants
  • If eating animal foods, choose ones that were raised on plant foods

(Of note, the authors point out that these dietary guidelines are beneficial not just to humans, but other species as well as the environment around us. A win-win-win if you are equally concerned about animal welfare as well as the impact of farming on the earth.) The well-known author/journalist Michael Pollan wasn’t too far off when he summed it up in seven words: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” And to clarify, he meant eat real food like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fish and lean meat. Or as he so simply states it: Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.

Some small steps to get started

I know what you’re probably thinking – easier said than done, especially if you work full-time, have a family to take care of and don’t want to (or can’t) spend hours focused on planning and preparing healthy meals! The good news is that it does not have to be hard. There is a plethora of resources available for anyone who is looking for a little help in this arena. I have listed a few of my personal favorites near the bottom of this post, but here are a few simple guidelines to help you get started:

  • Reduce the amount of processed foods you eat, which is pretty much anything that comes in a box or package with a food label on it. And if that food label has more than 5 ingredients or a bunch of ingredients you can’t pronounce, put it back on the shelf.

 

  • One way to help reduce the amount of processed foods you eat is to avoid the middle aisles at the grocery store as that is where most processed foods are found. You may already be familiar with the advice to shop the perimeter of the store, where most of the fresh foods are located (e.g., produce, fresh meats). Good advice and a great place to start.

 

  • Many of us could benefit from increasing our fruit and vegetable intake. Both the USDA MyPlate and the Harvard Healthy Eating Plate recommend that half your plate at meals consist of healthy fruits and vegetables (unfortunately, potatoes and French fries don’t count). There are so many choices when it comes to produce – experiment and find what works best for you, whether it is munching on raw veggies as a snack, drinking a fruit smoothie for breakfast, or adding a salad of leafy dark greens as a mainstay of your lunch and dinner. Even the pickiest of eaters can find a few fruits and veggies that they like.

Resources to help you take a deeper dive

As someone who is responsible for the bulk of meal planning and grocery shopping for my family, I understand that it may feel daunting to figure out how to put these recommendations into action. Thus, I have compiled a few resources that have really helped me in this arena. As I mentioned earlier, everyone is different so these may or may not work for you, but I pass them along as food for thought (pun intended).

There are many books and websites out there related to the “real food” movement, but one of my favorites is 100 Days of Real Food by Lisa Leake (the website and the related cookbooks). The reason it resonates with me is because it is a real family that made a pledge to reduce – or actually, eliminate – the amount of processed foods they ate and they were successful, even with two young children. My family has not yet taken the plunge to completely eliminate processed foods, but we have been inspired to reduce the processed foods in our diet and cook and eat more real, whole foods. I have one of Lisa’s cookbooks, which has many simple, healthy recipes (a key for me as I am not all that confident in the kitchen). Her website is also chock full of healthy recipes and meal plans for those who need a little extra help in the kitchen.

Given that my family’s quest to eat a truly healthy diet is still a work in progress, and we stumble from time to time with less than optimal choices, I have found comfort in the “good-better-best” approach when it comes to decisions about what to eat. I am not sure who gets credit for this principle, but I found a neat infographic on the Weed ‘Em and Reap website. In essence, this approach is about “doing the best you can with what you have” – which is all we can really ask, right? Maybe you’ll never live in the “best” column, but if you can make some small changes that bump you from bad to good or good to better in a couple of the food areas, that is reason to celebrate. Every little bit helps.

Finally, if you feel overwhelmed by the time and effort you think it might take to implement changes in your diet and seek a supportive community to help you on this journey, you may want to look into The New School Kitchen, or NSK as we members like to call it. The New School Kitchen is an interactive, video-based monthly membership program designed to help you “rock your cooking and eating without hating your family or life” as owner/creator Ryanna Battiste describes it. I have been a member since NSK was launched in August 2016 and it has been a huge help with meal planning and meal preparation centered around eating tasty, healthy real food. Members have access to everything from meal planning tips to healthy recipes to cooking demonstration videos. There is also a private Facebook group where members can ask questions, share resources and support one another along this real food journey. Most recently, the NSK has added the option of working with a health coach either individually or as a group. The beauty of the NSK is that it is self-paced – you determine when and how to engage and work at whatever pace suits your needs. Membership is only $21/month and you can cancel your subscription at any time.

(Note: In the spirit of full disclosure, Ryanna is a fellow Certified Integrative Health Coach – we did our training together at Duke Integrative Medicine. However, I am not getting compensated to promote NSK – in fact, she doesn’t even know that I am mentioning her business in this blog post. I hired Ryanna as my coach a couple of years ago when I decided to work on reducing dairy in my diet after years of suspecting that I had an intolerance. I can personally vouch for her integrity, wisdom and professionalism as a health coach. She is an amazing woman and to me, has created one of the most innovative approaches to healthy eating with The New School Kitchen. She is also just a ton of fun to watch in her videos as she’s not afraid to be real and share the ups and downs of her own real food journey.)

Whew, that was a lot to cover! Next time, we’ll move beyond what to eat and focus on how to eat – mindful eating, one of my favorite subjects!

 

The Wheel of Health and Your Optimal Health Journey

wheel2-878x1024Today I’d like to share an overview of the Duke Integrative Medicine Wheel of Health (WOH). This wheel provides a framework for creating your personalized health plan – and a map of your optimal health journey. We will explore the various parts of the wheel in-depth in subsequent posts, but for now, let’s look at the big picture.

The WOH represents the whole picture of your health and wellbeing. It is a multidimensional, whole person approach that considers body, mind and spirit. As you can see, it does not focus on just physical health. It goes beyond managing disease and instead emphasizes optimizing health.

Dimensions of the Wheel

You

At the center of the wheel is YOU, because health coaching is a person-centered process. Your health journey is driven by your values, goals and desires. As a coach, I won’t tell you what to do or not to do – you get to decide based on your priorities and what works for you.

Mindful Awareness

Surrounding the center of the wheel is Mindful Awareness. The concept of mindfulness – paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally – is a powerful tool and resource for behavior change.  Being more present and aware of what is happening to you and in you can help you respond to changes in your life in a more proactive, engaged way.

Self-Care

The green ring in the wheel represents the seven areas of self-care. People often focus their efforts here when making changes to their health behaviors. Evaluating your current and desired states in each of these areas can help you create a healthier life. These include:

Movement, Exercise and Rest – This area addresses physical activity, whether it be formal exercise (for example, running 30 minutes a day) or general activities of daily living (such as cleaning the house or grocery shopping). Just as important, it also incorporates the need for adequate rest (good sleep is vital!) and relaxation or “down time”.

Nutrition – In a nutshell, eating a balanced, healthy diet that fuels and nourishes your body and mind. There is no specific diet that is recommended. There are some key healthy eating strategies that we’ll discuss in a future post, but it is also based on what works for your body.

Personal and Professional Development –  It is helpful to assess where you are with personal, career or life goals, particularly at times of transition or milestones. These may include work-life balance, financial goals, and personal growth that will support optimal wellbeing. Regular assessment of your goals can reinforce healthy behavior choices.

Physical Environment – Studies have suggested that your surroundings at work and home can impact your health, either positively or negatively. Exposure to light, noise or toxins in your home or work space can have a major impact on how you feel physically and emotionally. On the other hand, a supportive, nurturing physical environment can enhance your sense of peace and wellness.

Relationships and Communication – Research demonstrates that positive relationships built on open, respectful communication with family, friends and colleagues can have a beneficial impact on your health. Identify those relationships in your life that fuel you and those that drain you. In doing so, you can invest in your positive connections and minimize or re-evaluate those relationships that don’t serve you.

Spirituality – This area is about finding purpose and meaning in something larger than oneself. For some people, it may include a religious affiliation. For others, it may be a connection to nature or the arts. Although the definition of spirituality is very personal in nature, the role that it plays in your life can transform your health.

Mind-Body Connection – This area relates back to the inner ring of Mindful Awareness. It focuses on mind-body practices that can help you be more present. Techniques include things that activate the body’s relaxation and healing response, like breathing practices, meditation, yoga, or guided imagery.

Professional Care

It is important to seek routine preventive medical care such as an annual physical exam, recommended cancer screenings (e.g., mammogram, colonoscopy) and vaccinations. In addition, you can supplement your usual medical care with complementary approaches such as acupuncture, massage, hypnosis or energy work. A primary goal of Integrative Medicine is to remove the distinction between conventional and complementary approaches and create one integrated approach to health care. In this model, patients and their providers work together to determine the most effective, evidence-based personalized health plan to achieve life-long wellbeing.