The Truth About the World

This isn’t a post about how I’ve figured out the meaning of life or why any of us were put on this earth. Rather, it is about a song, and more specifically, about the power of music – to lift us up, to carry us through, to help us heal in times of need.

I was recently introduced to the song “The Truth About the World” by Andrea Marie during a Saturday morning Zoom session with some local Nia sisters. To be honest, I couldn’t hear the song that well through Zoom but fortunately, I tagged it through the Shazam app. Later, I found the song through Apple Music and had a chance to listen more closely. And I was blown away.

The song starts with a simple blend of acoustic guitar and keyboard, with some soft, non-lyric vocals. Then comes the first verse:

Have you grown tired
of feeling alone
Numb to the earth
and numb to the soul

Whoa. My first thought was how these words struck a chord given that so many of us have been staying at home, social distancing since the pandemic started, leading to a sense of isolation – and a need for connection with loved ones, near and far. Then I learned that the song is from an album she released in 2016…and it made me think about how many people may have been feeling this way before the words “corona virus” became a part of the lexicon.

Over the next two verses, a variety of percussion instruments join in as well as some strings. A simple drum beat, echoing a heartbeat, growing louder as the song continues…and then we reach the repeating chorus:

Everyone is hurting
Everyone is searching
Everyone is looking
for the truth about love
For the truth about a god
For the truth about the world

On the fourth and final chorus, the instruments begin to drop out until it is just vocals and the drum beat. A simple end, mirroring the simple beginning to a song that is anything but simple in meaning. And so, so powerful. I have had this song on daily rotation for the last week – sometimes it makes me cry, other times it brings a sense of hope and healing. I was not surprised to learn that the artist is also a member of a contemporary worship band called United Pursuit. I don’t typically listen to “religious” music but there are times when music transcends faith.

Click here to listen to a live performance or search for the song on your favorite music streaming app.

Breathe in, breathe out

One of the self-care strategies that has helped me manage much of the anxiety and uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic is a daily meditation practice. For almost four years now, I have started my day with Insight Timer, listening to either a guided meditation or meditative music. As anyone who practices mindfulness meditation knows, a mainstay of the practice is focusing on your breath as a way to stay anchored in the present moment. Perhaps now more than ever, I have come to appreciate the calming power of deep breathing.

In thinking about the breath, I had the idea about a month ago to create a playlist of songs that have to do with the breath or breathing. A few favorite songs came to mind and I also did a quick search in my music library. I started with the following songs, but plan to add to the list as I come across others that fit the theme – and contribute to my peace of mind, particularly on those days when I am feeling rattled by the state of the world. Lately, I have been listening to this playlist on Monday mornings, as a way to start off the week on a positive note.

“Breathe” playlist
I’m Alive (with Dave Matthews) – Kenny Chesney
Breathe (feat. Colbie Caillat) – Taylor Swift
breathin – Ariana Grande
Breathe – Michelle Branch
Catch My Breath – Kelly Clarkson

If you have not already done so, I encourage you to use music as a way to manage the roller coaster of emotions you may experience as this pandemic continues to unfold and evolve, with no clear end in sight. Find songs that will make you smile when you are feeling down, as well as those that will help you relax when you’re wound a little too tight. You can even throw in the ones that make you want to get up and move. Create your #pandemicplaylists and tap into the healing power of music.

45: Celebrating the little things

Relax. This isn’t a post about the President. Having just celebrated my 45th birthday last Friday, I thought I would take a moment to share a key lesson I’ve learned over the years, one that I am most grateful for at this juncture in my life.

It’s the little things

It has taken me some time to really understand this lesson, but I have found that it truly is the little things in life that matter. I am sure I had older, wiser adults tell me this in my youth, but I think it takes living life and learning from your own journey to appreciate the message. I had a few “small moments” on my birthday and over the course of the weekend that created some special memories that I will not soon forget:

  • I had a few short trips in my car on my birthday, zipping around town from place to place. Every time I turned on the radio, some of my favorite songs happened to be playing. I couldn’t help but smile and sing along at the top of my lungs. Thanks to the universe’s DJ for spinning my favorite tunes!

 

  • During one of my car trips, I was approaching a red light at the bottom of a hill. To my left, there was a maintenance worker driving one of those industrial lawn mowers, trimming the tall grass at the corner of the road. As my car came to a stop, I instinctively looked up at the older gentleman driving the mower and we both broke out into huge grins and waved at one another. The next second, the light turned green and I was off. I have no idea who that man was, and I may never see him again in my life, but we shared a moment. A moment that set the tone for the rest of my day: it warmed my heart and made me more aware of the importance of human connection…whether with your loved ones or a perfect stranger at an intersection.

 

  • I spent most of my birthday with three other health coaches that are part of a Mastermind group. We had decided to engage in a visioning retreat, as we all desired to refocus our business efforts. After a brief check-in, we paired off for some dyad work. My colleague and I chose to answer the question “What’s inside of me that needs to get out?” For me, two themes kept coming up: the need to scratch my creative itch and the desire to inspire others. When we reconvened as a group, we all chose to make a “concrete” version (such as a vision board) of our respective visions. The coach who hosted us had brought along a plethora of arts and crafts materials, including river rocks. I knew immediately what I wanted – a simple visual reminder of my two themes: create and inspire. No need for a fancy vision board that will just gather dust in the corner. Just two simple rocks that now sit on my desk, keeping my vision in plain sight.

vision rocks

  • Perhaps the sweetest moment of the weekend unfolded on Sunday morning. I was on my way to the grocery store, when I approached the same intersection where I shared a moment with the maintenance worker. I noticed that a couple of cars in front of me seemed to be slowing down to avoid something in the road. I looked closer and saw this tiny white creature moving slowly across the road: it was a kitten, probably less than 2 months old. It was hesitating, given the large SUV and other car in its path. As a cat owner/lover, I had to do something. I pulled my car over to the shoulder and jumped out to go get it. Fortunately, there was very little traffic this early in the morning. I headed toward the kitten and when it saw me, it started to come toward me. I scooped it up and ran back to my car, gently placing it on the passenger side floor. With two other cats at home already, I knew that we couldn’t keep it, so I brought it to the emergency vet clinic in town. They said they were pretty sure they could place her (turns out “it” was a she) with a rescue group that would help find her a loving home. The whole adventure only lasted about an hour, but it was a highlight of my weekend and a birthday memory that will stay with me for years.

kitten 1

 

One of my favorite songs that I heard on the radio over the weekend is “Little Wonders,” a song from the movie Meet the Robinsons and written by Rob Thomas (who also happens to be one of my favorite singer/songwriters.) The lyrics below really capture the message in a beautiful way:

 

Our lives are made

In these small hours

These little wonders

These twists and turns of fate

Time falls away

But these small hours

These small hours still remain

 

In the future, when I look back on my 45th birthday, it is the events referenced above – those small hours and little wonders – that I will remember most.

Finding Nia and The Joy of Movement

Before I move on from exercise and movement, I want to share my experience with Nia. What is Nia, you ask? I’ll get to that in a minute, but I want to start by letting you in on a little secret – I don’t really like to exercise. I know –  shocking, right?! Many people have the false belief that health coaches and other wellness professionals work out for hours on end, eat only healthy foods and never struggle with the temptations that others battle every day. WRONG. We’re human too and are faced with making the same choices as everyone else regarding food, exercise and other lifestyle behaviors.

Exercise as “work”

As I mentioned in a previous post, I struggled with being overweight as a young adult. Becoming active in school sports helped me shed the excess pounds, but from that point on, I believed that I had to exercise to stay thin. In college, I took advantage of the campus fitness center and found a walking buddy. After college, I joined the local gym and spent many hours in aerobics classes, or on the treadmill. Occasionally, I worked up the nerve to use the weight machines or lightweight dumbbells to add some strength training. After my daughter was born, I bought a treadmill and some hand weights so I could exercise at home. I also found a series of walk at home DVDs and dabbled in some yoga and Pilates. But the whole time, from college forward, there was always this underlying sense of dread – that exercise was a chore, one more thing to check off on my daily to do list. Until I found Nia – and (re)discovered the joy of movement.

The Nia Technique®

The Nia Technique® is a holistic fitness practice addressing body, mind and soul. Nia combines movements and philosophies from martial arts, dance arts and healing arts, such as yoga, to help tone your body while transforming your mind. The classes are non-impact, practiced barefoot, and adaptable to individual needs and abilities.

I first learned about Nia through my wonderful massage therapist (and Nia teacher), Laura Ghantous. I must have complained enough about how much I disliked exercising but felt the need to do so to maintain a healthy weight. I recall she mentioned Nia at least a few times before I finally took the plunge and decided to give it a try. I won’t lie and say I loved it from the get go. I found it hard to let go of feeling self-conscious during the free dance portion and seeing a bunch of grown women roll around the floor at the end was a little…odd to say the least. But I did find myself connecting to my lifelong love of music and dance – it had been so long since I had danced! I forgot how much I loved it.

So, I stuck with it. I signed up for a class on Saturday mornings and with each class, I grew more comfortable – with myself, with my body, with the freedom to move MY body’s way. Unlike all those years I spent at the gym, in group fitness classes or on the treadmill, I never find myself watching the clock during a Nia class, wondering how long until it’s over and I can move on to do the things I really want to do. Now, I find myself disappointed when an hour passes too quickly and I realize class is over. What an amazing shift in perspective for me.

From student to teacher

After taking Nia classes for about six years, something clicked for me last year and I knew I was ready to take things to the next level. Nia training mirrors the colored belt system used in martial arts, and you can also choose to become a licensed teacher. In March, I successfully completed the first level of training, the White Belt Intensive, which focuses on physical sensation, body awareness, and self-knowledge – and is the minimum training required to teach Nia. There are 13 principles in the White Belt training. Principle One is the Joy of Movement – Sensing Life Force. The Joy of Movement is sensed as the “vibratory aliveness of being.” Now, that’s what I want to feel when I exercise. And I hope to inspire that in others as I begin teaching Nia classes this fall.

To learn more about Nia and to find classes in your area, visit www.nianow.com. If you live in the Triangle area of NC, visit www.TriangleNia.com to find classes near you.

Nia: Through movement we find health.